Archäologische Überreste des römischen Kastells Rigomagus

Remagen · Romantischer Rhein

Remagen in the Roman period

The fort at Remagen was situated on an important road between Cologne and Mainz. Located at the northern end of the Rhine Massif, the fort sat at the transition from this mountainous region to the Lower Rhine area and had a blocking function. The fort existed for almost 450 years from ca. 5 B.C. to ca. 450 A.D. Inscriptions on bricks and gravestones indicate the presence of five different troops (cohorts) during that time. The civil settlement (vicus) connected to the fort extended over a large area to the east and southeast of the fort. It was built at the same time as the fort. It is likely that the settlement also existed until the 5th century AD. The cemeteries were located along the roads leading out of the settlement to the east, southeast and west. The graves date from the early 1st century A.D. to the 5th/6th century A.D. the Merovingian period.
An extraordinary find from Remagen is a Roman gravestone with an inscription stating that a 35-year-old soldier named Dasmenus from the area of present-day Serbia was buried in Remagen. The stone dates from between 40 and 69 AD.
The Roman remains of Remagen are now almost completely covered by the modern city. However, the location of the fort and the course of the Roman roads can still be partially discerned in today's townscape. The fort, civilian settlement and cemeteries are located within the modern city of Remagen.
Remagen is one of 44 sites in the nomination file to include the Lower German Limes as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The nomination file was submitted by representatives of the Netherlands, North Rhine-Westphalia and Rhineland-Palatinate to the UNESCO World Heritage Center in Paris on 9 January 2020.

Archäologische Überreste des römischen Kastells Rigomagus